University Art Museum

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Name:
University Art Museum
Address:
University Center for the Arts, 1400 Remington Street, Fort Collins, CO, 80524, United States
Description:

Tues. – Sat., 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Closed on university holidays.

Upcoming Events At This Venue

September 1, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 1, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 2, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 2, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 3, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 3, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 4, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 4, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

In association with the First Friday Gallery Walk, the University Art Museum has extended hours from 6-8 p.m. on the following dates:

Sept. 4, Oct. 2, Nov. 6, and Dec. 4.

The Art Museum is currently showing the exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present.

Scrimmage gathers original works of art for the first comprehensive survey of work by prominent American artists with subject matter that examines the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport which had its origins in the 19th century in the Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography and new-media art, featured in the exhibition, football can be read as cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our countries history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day–class; race, assimilation and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

Date: September 4, 2015 6:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 5, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 5, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 8, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 8, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 9, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 9, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 10, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 10, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: September 10, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

September 11, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 11, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 12, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 12, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 15, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 15, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 16, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 16, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 17, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 17, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Date: September 17, 2015 2:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

September 18, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 18, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 19, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 19, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 22, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 22, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 23, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 23, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 24, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 24, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 25, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 25, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 26, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 26, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 29, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 29, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

September 30, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: September 30, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 1, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 1, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: October 1, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

October 2, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 2, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

In association with the First Friday Gallery Walk, the University Art Museum has extended hours from 6-8 p.m. on the following dates:

Oct. 2, Nov. 6, and Dec. 4.

The Art Museum is currently showing the exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present.

Scrimmage gathers original works of art for the first comprehensive survey of work by prominent American artists with subject matter that examines the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport which had its origins in the 19th century in the Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography and new-media art, featured in the exhibition, football can be read as cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our countries history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day–class; race, assimilation and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

Date: October 2, 2015 6:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 3, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 3, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 6, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 6, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 7, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 7, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 8, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 8, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 9, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 9, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 10, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 10, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 13, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 13, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 14, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 14, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 15, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 15, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: October 15, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

October 16, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 16, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 17, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 17, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 20, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 20, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

Date: October 20, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

October 21, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 21, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 22, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 22, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 23, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 23, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 24, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 24, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 27, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 27, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 28, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 28, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 29, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 29, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: October 29, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

October 30, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 30, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

October 31, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: October 31, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 3, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 3, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Date: November 3, 2015 12:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

November 4, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 4, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 5, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 5, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 6, 2015

In association with the First Friday Gallery Walk, the University Art Museum has extended hours from 6-8 p.m. on Nov. 6, and Dec. 4.

The Art Museum is currently showing the exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present.

Scrimmage gathers original works of art for the first comprehensive survey of work by prominent American artists with subject matter that examines the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport which had its origins in the 19th century in the Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography and new-media art, featured in the exhibition, football can be read as cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our countries history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day–class; race, assimilation and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

Date: November 6, 2015 6:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 6, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 7, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 7, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 10, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 10, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 11, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 11, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 12, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 12, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: November 12, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

November 13, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 13, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 14, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 14, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 17, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 17, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 18, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 18, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 19, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 19, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 20, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 20, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 21, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 21, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 24, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 24, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 25, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 25, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 26, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 26, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 27, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 27, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

November 28, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: November 28, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 1, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 1, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 2, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 2, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 3, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 3, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

 

Michael Oriard

Michael Oriard

A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with SCRIMMAGE.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

Date: December 3, 2015 4:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public

December 4, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 4, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

In association with the First Friday Gallery Walk, the University Art Museum has extended hours from 6-8 p.m. on Dec. 4.

The Art Museum is currently showing the exhibition Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present.

Scrimmage gathers original works of art for the first comprehensive survey of work by prominent American artists with subject matter that examines the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport which had its origins in the 19th century in the Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography and new-media art, featured in the exhibition, football can be read as cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our countries history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day–class; race, assimilation and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

Date: December 4, 2015 6:00 pm
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 5, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 5, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 8, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 8, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 9, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 9, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 10, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 10, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 11, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 11, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 12, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 12, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 15, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 15, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 16, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 16, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 17, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 17, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 18, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 18, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.

December 19, 2015

Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present
August 28-December 18

The University Art Museum presents Scrimmage: Football in American Art from the Civil War to the Present, the first comprehensive survey of original works by prominent American artists examining the quintessentially American sport of football, a sport with its origins in the 19th century Ivy League colleges of the eastern seaboard. Following the CSU venue, the exhibition will travel to the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon. Through the enthusiastic response of institutions and private collectors throughout the country, the exhibition brings works from major museums and private collections by important artists from the 19th through the 21st century including Winslow Homer, Frederic Remington, George Bellows, John Steuart Curry, Thomas Hart Benton, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and a host of others.

Through paintings, prints, sculpture, photography, and new-media art featured in this exhibition, football can be read as a cultural narrative that reflects attitudes and transitions in our country’s history. Significant artists have regularly depicted aspects of the sport which reflect themes central to American life from the Civil War period to the present day: class; race, assimilation, and integration; gender relationships and the place of women in sports; patriotism and capitalism; violence and war; public spectatorship; and mass-media/celebrity culture.

The exhibition illuminates and reveals themes that continue from the earliest historical images to the present day. For example, debates about violence and long-term health issues were explored by artists as early as the 19th century. The exhibition examines these artworks through multiple interpretative formats – text, special programming events, and an exhibition catalogue – in order to involve a broad spectrum of visitors in this important discussion.

Scrimmage is a truly interdisciplinary project; the museum is pleased to thank our CSU Team: Dr. Albert Bimper (Ethnic Studies), Dr. Robert Gudmestad (History), Dr. Emily Moore (Art and Art History), Dr. Constance DeVereaux (LEAP Institute), Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos (Economics), the CSU Marching Band, and the Department of Athletics for their support and participation. This exhibition is organized by the Unversity Art Museum at Colorado State University and the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon.

SPECIAL EVENTS AND GUESTS

Exhibition Grand Opening
Friday, August 28, 6-8 p.m. University Art Museum

Celebrate the opening of Scrimmage with the CSU Marching Band and other special guests.

Scrimmage Visiting Critic Lecture: Dr. Michael Oriard
Gladiators: Reading the Concussion Crisis and Footballs Future Through the Visual Arts
Wednesday, September 9, 5 p.m. Griffin Concert Hall, UCA

Michael Oriard, distinguished professor of American Literature and Culture (Emeritus) at Oregon State University, walked on as a defensive end at the University of Notre Dame, and earned a spot as a starting center. He left Notre Dame with a graduate fellowship to study literature, as well as a position with the Kansas City Chiefs. After receiving his PhD from Stanford, Oriard joined the faculty at Oregon State University. He is the author of four cultural studies of football (Reading Football, 1993; King Football, 2001; Brand NFL, 2007; and Bowled Over, 2009) and a memoir (The End of Autumn, 1982, 2009). Long interested in issues of brain trauma, Oriard turns his attention to the history of images and how they give us insights into these important and topical issues.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Monique Crine
Thursday, September 17, 2 p.m. University Art Museum

Denver-based artist Monique Crine, is known for her compelling paintings, drawn from photographs. Crine’s painting, Richard, included in the Scrimmage exhibition, is drawn from a photograph of her father in football uniform, and relates to her current practice. Recently shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, Crine’s new series on professional football players, explores athletes as iconic American figures. Crine’s visit is sponsored, in-part, by SOVA, the Student Organization of Visual Art.

Scrimmage Visiting Artist Lecture: Shaun Leonardo
Macho Ritual and the Performance of Masculinity
Wednesday, October 14, 5 p.m. Organ Recital Hall, UCA

Shaun Leonardo probes conventions of portraiture to reveal complexities of masculinity and manhood. Through physically demanding performances, as well as cutout paintings, drawings, and sculpture, Leonardo negotiates ideals of worth, achievement, and the experience of failure. Leonardo’s work Bull in the Ring, 2008, is featured in the exhibition Scrimmage. The work derives from Leonardo’s collegiate football career at Bowdoin College in which he re-enacts a drill, since banned, in order to investigate themes of extreme masculinity.

Scrimmage Gallery Talk: Gary Huibregtse
The Athletic Moment: Photographic Evolution in Scrimmage
Tuesday, November 3, 12 p.m. University Art Museum

With a thirty-year tenure at CSU, Gary Huibregtse leads the Photo Image Making program in the Department of Art and Art History. In this gallery talk, Professor Huibregtse leads visitors through an overview of aesthetic developments in the photographic medium as they relate to images in the Scrimmage exhibition.

Scrimmage Gallery Panel: American Indian Mascots in Sports: The Persistence & Reinforcement of Stereotypes
A discussion with Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, Ty Smith (director of NACC), Leslee Lovato (office of admissions) and Tiffani Kelly (assistant director of NACC)
Tuesday, October 20, 4 p.m. University Art Museum

A section of Scrimmage addresses how images of football reflected racial and ethnic prejudice in our history. While African American and Native American players distinguished themselves on the football gridiron, their images are rarely seen in the early history of football art; instead they are reduced to racial stereotypes, or parodied in mascot imagery. This issue remains topical today. Join the museum for a discussion with a panel including Colorado Representative Joe Salazar, sponsor of a recent bill concerning the persistence of American Indian mascots at schools and sports franchises, on mascots and the impact of this imagery on Native peoples. This program is presented in conjunction with Native American Cultural Center (NACC) at CSU.

SPORTS TALK IN THE ART MUSEUM
A series of talks on sport and art, in conjunction with Scrimmage.
Thursdays, 4 p.m.

Talkin’ Gender: Sept. 10
Dr. Michael Oriard, visiting critic, professor emeritus, American Literature and Culture, Oregon State. On gender issues in football and football art.

Talkin’ Race: Oct. 1
Dr. Albert Bimper, assistant professor, ethnic studies, senior associate athletics director for diversity, inclusion, and engagement. On African American athletes and the lack of representation in sports imagery and history.

Talkin’ Tough: Oct. 15
Shaun Leonardo, visiting artist. On the artist’s performance and video work that question notions of masculinity as related to sport.

Talkin’ Money: Oct. 29
Dr. Nancy Jianakoplos, professor, economics. On football economics, including controversies surrounding the status of collegiate players.

Talkin’ Success: Nov. 12
Dr. Robert Gudmestad, associate professor, history. On football’s supplanting of baseball as America’s game.

Talkin’ Back: Dec. 3
Linny Frickman, director, University Art Museum. On the art museum as a site for discussion of sports and cultural issues.

TOURS AND CLASS VISITS – Please call the museum at 491-1989 to schedule group visits.

Date: December 19, 2015 10:00 am
Cost: FREE and open to the public.