• John McGuire •

jmcguire

The Basics

Name: John McGuire
Department: 
  • Music
Role: Faculty
Position:  Special Assistant Professor of Horn
Concentration:  Horn, Music Appreciation, Brass Techniques

Contact Info

Phone: (970) 491-8515
Office: Horn, Music Appreciation, Brass Techniques
Email: John.McGuire@colostate.edu


Bio

Dr. John McGuire has a vast array of performance and teaching experiences. He has performed with many orchestras around the country, most notably the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, the Dallas Opera, the Fort Worth Symphony, the New World Symphony in Miami, FL, the Civic Orchestra of Chicago, the Illinois Symphony Orchestra, and the Florida West Coast Symphony.

As a soloist he was awarded the title “Yamaha Young Artist,” has been a finalist in the American Horn Competition, won several regional solo competitions and has appeared as a guest artist at many workshops, festivals and schools across the United States. With several world-premiere performances to his credit, John is a passionate proponent for the creation of new solo horn literature as well as a sought-after contemporary music performer.

Prior to serving on the faculty of CSU, John served as Adjunct Instructor of Horn at the University of Alabama, Mississippi State University, Appalachian State University, Texas Women’s University, the Music Institute of Chicago, and Florida A&M University. In addition, John maintained a private studio of over fifty students in the Dallas/Fort Worth area public school systems for many years where he was also a prominent clinician and adjudicator. Today, many of John’s former students have moved into successful careers as music educators in reputable school systems and have attained positions as orchestral performers in premier ensembles such as the Detroit Symphony Orchestra.

John received his DMA and BM in Music Performance from the University of Alabama, his MM in Performance from Florida State University, and a Performer’s Certificate from the Chicago College of Performing Arts at Roosevelt University in Chicago. His major professors were Charles “Skip” Snead, William Capps and Dale Clevenger.