E425 – Restoration and 18th-century

Credit Hours:
3

Course Level:
Undergraduate

Semesters Offered:
Spring

Prerequisite: One course in Literature.

Description: The course surveys poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction written between 1660 to the end of the eighteenth century. The period nurtured a variety of literary moods and forms: shockingly bawdy Restoration comedy, slyly devastating mock-epic, earnestly moral periodical essays, tearfully sentimental domestic tragedy, and frighteningly phantasmagoric gothic. Along with studying examples of such diverse literary works, the course also touches upon the most enduring literary legacy of the eighteenth century – the emergence of the novel. The unusual literary fecundity of the long eighteenth century arose from an unprecedented expansion of print culture and a range of cultural, philosophical, political and material changes. The diverse literary strands in eighteenth-century literature exemplify different responses to these shifts. Thus, the wide range of readings in different tones and genres introduce you to the richness of eighteenth-century literature as well as culture. Some of the authors you might encounter in this course are, William Wycherley, Aphra Behn, Alexander Pope, Jonathan Swift, Richard Steele, Samuel Johnson, Daniel Defoe, Henry Fielding, Samuel Richardson, Horace Walpole and Mary Wollstonecraft.

Requirements fulfilled by this course: Category 1